October 7, 2022

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Top Three Women Empowerment Movies to Watch Now

Let us raise our glasses to the women! If stories about legendary female leaders inspire you to take on patriarchy, odds are the silver screen will do the same. And, thankfully, there are so many films out there that honor women in all their forms and sizes that you don’t even have to leave Netflix’s main page or stop playing on meilleur casino en ligne Canada. These are triumphant stories, chronicles of adolescence and daily rebellions, triumphant victories that demonstrate how far we’ve come while emphasizing how far we still have to go.

1. Promising Young Woman

Directed by Emerald Fennell

Promising Young Woman isn’t your standard female revenge film; it’s a mirror that forces us to confront unpleasant truths about our culture and, consequently, ourselves. This unconventional, at times flawed, but captivating blend of mystery and black humor is a feminist classic that checks all the boxes. While Emerald Fennell’s directorial debut frequently adheres to girl power movie stereotypes, it also takes great satisfaction in exceeding most expectations. Shot in just 23 days, Promising Young Woman is truly spectacular.

Carey Mulligan plays Cassie, a 30-year-old medical school dropout who still lives with her family and works at a coffee shop, much to her dismay and that of her boss, Laverne Cox. Cassie looks to be nothing at all like the strong female leads we anticipate to see on the big screen, with no professional or personal objectives, significant others, or typical hobbies. But, as it turns out, appearances may be deceiving.

2. Lady Bird

Directed by Greta Gerwig

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Lady Bird is a unique women empowerment film that portrays a stunning portrayal of adolescence. The film is set in Sacramento and follows Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson, performed by Saoirse Ronan, a high school student who is unafraid of the concerns that other teens face. She insists on being addressed by her given name, Lady Bird—a name she chose herself—bravely nudges her crush on the shoulder, inviting him to a dance, and walks around the world with all the confidence in the world.

Although the film teases with the concept of being a coming-of-age story, it’s more concerned with delving into Lady Bird’s tumultuous relationship with her mother Marion. Marion is an exhausted nurse whose forthright pessimism is a humorous contrast to her daughter’s hopes of relocating to New York, “where the culture is,” as Lady Bird puts it. Every moment between this mother-daughter combo is unique, with their inability to speak triggering emotions that practically every woman can identify with.

3. Kill Bill: Volume I

Directed by Quentin Tarantino

Kill Bill: Volume I takes place in a world that seems and sounds like Earth—but it isn’t. It’s a girl-power cosmos where economics, law, work, physiology, and gravity don’t apply; a world formed by Tarantino’s Spaghetti Western and Asian martial-arts fantasies. Kill Bill: Volume I is brutal yet addicting, proving once again that Tarantino is your man when you need a blast of film adrenaline.

The film opens with a trademark from the 1970s Hong Kong production studio Shaw Brothers, implying that there would be more movie allusions than a term of film school ahead. The heroine’s yellow jumpsuit is a nod to Bruce Lee’s Game of Death, and the Kato masks are most likely a nod to Lee’s Green Hornet. Sonny Chiba, a famous Japanese action actor, was cast as a legendary swordsmith, while Chiaki Kuriyama reprised her killer-schoolgirl image. Tarantino’s vengeance film finally informs audiences that Kill Bill is a homage to Uma Thurman’s surviving energy.

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