December 7, 2022

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The myth of the tortured artist must end

The myth of the tortured artist must end

Break out of the received ideas surrounding Tchaikovsky, Van Gogh, Nelligan, Sylvia Plath, Amy Winehouse and others: No, creating doesn’t have to suffer. Let’s just say, art doesn’t necessarily derive its source from suffering. Conversely, creativity can contribute to well-being in general, and mental health in particular.

Published at 11:00 am.

Sylvia Kalibo

Sylvia Kalibo
Pres

Emerging from a conference presented at the Society for the Technical Arts (SAT) these days, it questions the false (and overused?) links between creativity and mental health. Baptized “In Balance”, the conference, meant to be profound, brings to the public two well-known personalities to explore this existential subject: the singer Florence Kay, currently a PhD in psychology, as well as the director and YouTuber Emile Roy (from the first edition of Oasis Immersion at the Palais des Congresses). , including a medium-length film, to which we owe several projects of concern (Anxiety at 21e century) Relief (mental health services provided by an NPO) we are indebted to for their efforts to bring them together.

“Mental health doesn’t have to be glamorous or glamorous, unfortunately. Doing it in the SAT dome makes it more alive. […] It creates a bubble around us and we feel in another universe! “, launched earlier this week by the side of the general Florence Kay, where she gave a clear and convincing testimony (special mention to her brief a cappella song to demonstrate to us a relaxed and integrated effect. Music).

Photo by Marco Campanosi, The Press

The presentation begins with a short meditation workshop signed in Tripura.

Lasting 1h15, the presentation begins with a short meditation workshop, requiring well-being. Seated comfortably on beanbags, visitors are invited to do some short breathing exercises. Coach Virtual, projected into the dome.

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Note: Here, however, the deeper part of the experience ends, the main presentation will be typical in its form later. This does not detract from its relevance, it must be said.

A myth to dispel

The conference then alternates between historical critiques, psychological explanations, and personal testimonies. Speaking of testimonials, Florence Kay recalls her particular journey: from being born into a family of artists (she learned to read notes before letters) to discovering bipolarity, through her “hole” inside her, her ups, her downs, her “channel” in music, her career, Then his suicidal thoughts, and finally his hospitalization. “I decided not to come back, that’s why I studied psychology…”

Photo by Marco Campanosi, The Press

Florence Kay, singer, researcher and lecturer

We create because we suffer or we suffer because we create!

Florence Kay, Artist, Researcher and Lecturer

This famous myth (which goes back to Plato), of course, has been deconstructed by science over the years (mental health is a matter of multifaceted elements called “biopsychosocial”, as Florence Kay insists here), and still has a hard life. “And this is a big problem in the clinic, because a lot of artists don’t want treatment, because they are afraid of losing their creativity! We wanted to hear him go deeper into his ideas, but the main thing is: “It’s important to seek help! “, she summarizes.

For Emily Roy, in her famous energetic tone (her YouTube channel has more than 160,000 subscribers), she chose to “turn” the problem upside down in search of solutions. “When you’re suffering, one of the answers is to create,” he says, citing illustrations, poems and other quotes. “And because it’s a legacy of anxiety, it comes with the need to express yourself! This exposure is great. Florence Kay knows something about this, she’s organizing a choir these days with people struggling with mental disorders. “And the connections that are made are so simple! »

Photo by Marco Campanosi, The Press

Emil Roy, director and YouTuber

discipline ? “Art is an outlet that allows you to express what you cannot express,” concludes Emile Roy. We have to find a way to bring out what drags us down and burdens us…” In an interview, the young man continues: “I see art as a solution to suffering. This emerges from my research and my meetings with psychologists. It comes back a lot. Art is the expression of the otherwise inexpressible. […] We are not helpless! »

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“In Balance” is offered on November 12th and 13th and December 10th and 11th at the Dome of the SAT.