October 6, 2022

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Samian is right to be angry

Samian is right to be angry

There are these controversies, in which we do not even understand the logic or merit. So it goes Highly publicized controversy between rapper Samian and Festival International de la Sanson de Cronby (FICG).

This is because the organizers of the FICG asked the priest to present his program, in whole or in part, in French. His angry reaction is completely understandable.

It is true that FICG’s industry is promoting French language song. The truth is that Samian’s latest CD – Nicamo – 100% sung in the Anishinabe language. Nothing is hidden there.

His last work as a renowned artist testifies to his very long work in rediscovering Algonquin’s side of his family heritage. The Anishinape language, which he must master because his first language is French, is obviously an integral part of it.

Samian, who was confronted by the FICG for refusing to allow himself to be fully cast in Anishinabe, pointed out that he sees it as an expression of the colonial mentality. However, it is difficult to know the real motive of the FICG on this important issue.

Is this really a colonial reflex? Or is it simply non-judgment? Or the inability to think outside of one’s own invitation box? It is a question of knowing whether they are more visible and audible, in line with the legitimate need of the tribes that have been marginalized for centuries.

Confirmation only

I have no answer. It is only certain that this controversy is infinitely tragic. Singing or singing in the language of the tribe is the only way to at least open up new communication channels between FICG and local artists.

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Because at the bottom of things, Samian is pointing the finger at the undeniable reality. He insists that the native languages ​​are not foreign to Quebec or threaten the French language. Instead, one would be tempted to add.

The preamble to the French Language Charter (Bill 101) states unequivocally: “The National Assembly recognizes the descendants of the Amerindians and Inuit, the first citizens of Quebec, who have the right to preserve and cultivate their own language. Culture.”

As it should be, Bill 101 does not go into the confusing water of whether this basic principle is based on the origin or the mother tongue of the people who demand it. Of course, this policy does not have to depend on it.

Whether or not Samione’s first language was Anishinabe, his existentialist search for his alkonquin roots was his own. Point.

And that pride …

In this vast world, when all origins are combined, large numbers of people, as part of their lineage, go in search of a language that has been forgotten or destroyed by all sorts of political and historical circumstances.

This job – because it – requires tons of love, patience, effort and pride. Yes, proud. This popular word, these days, is given to us by little chance in Quebec.

If there are people who have been able to take the full extent of the difficult task of preserving a threatened language and culture for a long time, it is only the people of Quebec. Here, too, all appearances combined.

Samian often says he seeks to build a bridge between French-speaking culture and tribal culture. The lens is fantastic.

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However, each bridge must have two banks to connect to each other without distorting each other. The bridge is the passageway, the junction, not the steam.

FICG has yet to open it. Its organizers are definitely talented for it. Reconciliation is within reach. That’s what it’s like.