December 1, 2022

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ELLE France retracts an article from "Canadian" recipes

ELLE France retracts an article from “Canadian” recipes

Kickass pancakes with blueberries”, lemon and pistachio bars, a ” Cookies Giant with Cranberries »… Are these Canadian recipes? According to She is France, yes. After a 2016 article on Ricardo Larrivée, which described him as a “gentleman trapper,” the magazine this week published an offbeat and — according to many — folksy view of Quebec.

Posted at 12:33 p.m.
Updated at 4:05 p.m.

Florence Doncas

Florence Doncas
Pres

Contacted on Tuesday by Pres About the article, author Digital ofshe France Apologized. “We are very sorry for our recipes and the chef’s presentation [Ricardo Larrivée (en 2016)] May have offended our Quebec friends. We are going to publish an article on these recipes on the ELLE website. In the next few hours fr should not further fuel the controversy,” wrote editor Julie Desagne in a written response on Tuesday morning.

“12 Canadian Recipes Other Than Poutine” , Published on October 13 – and not published this Tuesday morning – on the ELLE à catalog website , gives a brief summary of the origins of Canadian cuisine, where “many recipes […] Their origins are in France, England or Scotland, but more recently also in East Asia.

We’re talking about traditional Canadian cuisine, referring to the “famous” poutine, tourtiere, shepherd’s pie, but also Johnnie. Cake.

Then twelve recipes are offered that are Canadian and perfect for “celebrating fall”: Trish Design (author of Irish cookbooks), pork and Quebec terrine with caramelized butternut risotto with maple syrup; Cranberriesof Kickass pancakes A Quebec vegetarian shepherd’s pie with blueberries, ketchup CranberriesLemon and Pistachio Bars, Raisin and Pecan Pie, a Cake Pecan nuts and maple syrup, chicory-coffee ice cream, baked beans, a Cookies Giant with Cranberries and maple syrup and a pumpkin with speculations.

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According to Michael Lambert, author of the book A history of family cooking in Quebec, the selected recipes represent English-Canadian and “contemporary” cuisines. “The words used are for the French people,” he adds.

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

  • Screenshot from the Elle Table website

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The article caused reactions from many netizens, including food columnist Allison Van Russell. “Honey She is FranceIn French we say cranberry, no Cranberries. In Canada they are blueberries, not bilberries. Pecans are more common than pecans and speculoos are not entirely Canadian,” he wrote on his Facebook page.

Caroline Décoste and Mathieu Charlebois from cooking blog Vas-tu fini ton assiette also shared the article on their Facebook page. “We actually laughed because we see France as our old homeland, we have the relative syndrome, but we realize that they don’t know much about us,” says Caroline DeCoste.

Mathieu Charlebois thinks that the text “may have caused little injury or not even a scratch” to the Quebecers, but it invites them to greater thought. “I think it’s a good time to understand the times when others have called out cultural appropriation in the kitchen,” she says.

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magazine She is France Already caused controversy in Quebec in 2016 after publication Essay dedicated to Ricardo Larrivy Stopped with clichés. The journalist later defended himself as he said some of the revelations were “making people dream” in France.