November 27, 2021

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Corona virus in Europe.  More and more countries are tightening their regulations

Corona virus in Europe. More and more countries are tightening their regulations

  • Denmark has reinstated the obligation to provide a certificate of vaccination in some places, while Norway imposes quarantine requirements for unvaccinated people coming from some countries, including Poland
  • In Estonia, which has a population of 1.3 million, the epidemic is now more serious and, as in other Baltic countries, it is among the most difficult in Europe.
  • In the Czech Republic, from November 1, the validity period of antigen tests was reduced to 1 day, and the validity of the PCR test was reduced to 72 hours
  • Due to the large number of coronavirus infections in Berlin from Monday, and in Bavaria from next Tuesday, the 2G rule (admission to vaccination and convalescence) will apply.
  • More information can be found on Onet homepage

As of Friday, the obligation to provide certificates of vaccination against COVID-19 has been restored in Denmark, among other countries in restaurants and buildings where there are more than 200 people or places with a capacity of 2,000 people. people in the air.

In Norway, quarantine requirements have been reintroduced to unvaccinated people arriving, among others from Poland. In some cities, incl. In Tromsø in the north of the country, local restrictions apply until mid-November: requirements for masks on public transport, a distance of one meter and limited opening hours for restaurants.

In Finland, with the community approaching the herd immunity threshold (about 80% of the population currently received two doses of the vaccine), most epidemiological restrictions were lifted at the beginning of October. The current recommendation to wear masks in public (no note has been made since the outbreak) has been changed to using masks “at your own discretion”.

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Stricter regulations in Estonia

In Estonia, which has a population of 1.3 million, the epidemic is now more serious and, as in other Baltic countries, it is among the most difficult in Europe. Due to the burden placed on healthcare and the slow progress of vaccination, the government recently decided that a negative coronavirus test result would not be a pass to some public places and facilities (such as cultural, entertainment, restaurants, bars and cafes). These places – at least until the beginning of January – are only available to vaccinated people.

At the end of October, the obligation to wear masks in most public places was restored. After the end of the so-called fall school holidays, some local governments (eg the capital Tallinn) decided to switch schools (grades 4-8) to distance learning for a short time. Nowadays, the examination system has become almost universal in schools. Students take the test at home, alone or under the supervision of an adult, and must submit their results three times a week.

Bulgaria with green passports

In Bulgaria, in mid-October, the obligation has the so-called green passports, ie certificates confirming vaccination, infection, negative antigen test or polymerase chain reaction. The certificates, which will also be obtained by people with high levels of antibodies, entitle them to enter a number of public facilities – restaurants, shopping malls, gyms and cinemas. It should be owned by both employees and customers, and can also be applied to school staff and medical staff. In nearly two-thirds of the country’s schools, students learn remotely, and from midweek onwards, students in grades 1-4 are allowed to study full-time after testing twice a week. If the parents do not agree to the test, the children learn from a distance.

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Czechs and Slovaks focus on Covid certificates

In the Czech Republic, from November 1, the validity period of antigen tests has been reduced to 1 day, and the validity of PCR to 72 hours. Tests funded by health insurance funds will only be performed on doctor’s orders or hygiene services and on people under 18 years of age or receiving their first dose of the vaccination. The duty to verify vaccination certificates by employees of restaurants, cafes and bars has also been introduced. In practice, anyone who does not have a certificate should not be presented, but it is already known that some restaurant owners will not respect the provisions, risking significant penalties.

On Friday, the Slovak Parliament adopted a draft amendment that allows the introduction of certificates of the Corona virus in workplaces, which indicate vaccination, passing an infection or a negative test result. If the employee does not have the certificates and does not want to take the tests, the employer is obliged to provide them, and the refusal will mean unpaid leave. The regulations provide for the examination of certificates, including their authenticity, by the owners of service companies, restaurants, bars, clubs and hotels, otherwise the building may be closed for 30 days. The authorities had announced earlier that the new rules would apply in the provinces suffering the worst of the epidemic, as service establishments, restaurants and hotels would be opened to only vaccinated people.

2G base in Berlin and Bavaria

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Due to the large number of coronavirus infections in Berlin from Monday, and in Bavaria from next Tuesday, the 2G rule (acceptance of vaccinations and convalescence) will apply. Access to restaurants, cinemas or sports facilities will no longer be possible for people with negative tests only. Because of the sharp increase in infections across the country, free tests for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 have also been reintroduced.

Changes in vaccinations in France

In France, it was announced that from mid-December, the health passport of people over 65 years of age will be subject to a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

After September decisions to scrap the requirement to wear face masks in outdoor public places and in school yards, the Portuguese government in October lifted the 1.5-meter social distancing system at temples and restrictions on the number of people attending there. The Ministry also lifted the ban on parents of children entering nurseries and abolished restrictions on the number of people in catering and entertainment establishments. The requirement for customers to present a Covid passport has also been stopped.