February 4, 2023

MoviesOnline

Complete Canadian News World

Xavier Dolan had to "give up" "a dozen Quebec songs" for his series

Xavier Dolan had to “give up” “a dozen Quebec songs” for his series

On the occasion of the release of his miniseries At night Laurier Gaudreult woke up Presented at Club Illico, Xavier Dolan discusses the difficulty of integrating Quebec songs into cinema or television.

• Read more: Club Illigo: Patrick Hivon explodes on screen in “The Night Laurier Gautrault Woke Up”

• Read more: “The Night Laurier Gottreault Woke Up”: A breathtaking psychological thriller

“There are a lot of songs from Quebec that I wanted to use by Isabelle Boulay, Bruno Pelletier, which were actually rights-removed because at that time, the artists were at the beginning of their careers and they wanted to give up their rights to their “label”. [maisons de disque là] went bankrupt or sold their catalog to the big players,” he explained to QUB Radio.


The director lamented that a certain record company had closed the door on him, “It doesn’t answer the phone, it charges a fortune and it prevents the people of Quebec from hearing the artists’ songs on television or in the cinema. It prevents the artists, through consistency, to fit into the works over time, to fit into the tradition”, on the microphone of Sophie Durocher. He added.

The system Dolan describes has lost some of his Quebec repertoire.

“I had to give up about ten Quebec songs, because I didn’t have an answer from the same label, or because it was too expensive because of the way the prices are calculated, which would guarantee a song. I would get the same price as Ginette Reno’s Coldplay song”, he regretted.

The Quebec producer responded to a journalist’s question about youth dissatisfaction with Quebec culture.

See also  "Star Academy": Audrey-Louise's Controversial Deviation, Laura Fabian Explains Teachers' Selection

“It hurts me in general about our culture and our identities, that something is being lost […], he advanced. We have to find that generation whose visual standards, story standards, are a little bit different from what we’re offering.