“Being Young”: Filmed over five years, 10 young people reveal themselves

Ten teenagers are filmed by a film crew, from their entry into high school to their senior prom, for a daring documentary series. Being young. Interspersed with time and sometimes honest, sometimes disarmingly vivid reflections, it plunges us straight into the heart of adolescence.

Photo provided by Télé-Québec

These 10 young people come from different parts of Quebec, come from different cultural backgrounds, and each have different personal problems. Without knowing or meeting each other, they leave childhood and become young people before our eyes.

To director Marisol Aubé (Lat Meno, Fashion Dust), “It was an incredible experience”, demanding and of course “a huge headache [sa] vie».

Andre, 13, tours the house his father is renovating for his family.

Photo provided by Télé-Québec

Andre, 13, tours the house his father is renovating for his family.

“It's a very important period, adolescence. There are things we carry with us throughout our lives. There we live the experiences that mark our adult lives,” he told QMI Agency, now hoping the series will resonate and fuel discussions among youth and parents alike.

“It's crazy to have the privilege of going into these homes and visiting these families for five years and gathering the confidence that teenagers have to give me,” she added, noting that she doesn't have the role of a psychologist or a character. Parents, she only listened to them.

Teenagers have their say

Good players and participants, the teenagers entered this unique social experience without asking too many questions, “and with their naturalness,” the director underlined, including his son Mika, one of the participants. “That's the beauty of the show. We don't look like they make TV. They're very real and I think it's still rare to see teenagers on TV so natural and real,” she said.

Mika, aged 13, after confession,

Photo provided by Télé-Québec

Mika, 13, after the confession, in the documentary series “Being a Teenager”.

Without the Net, in 12 chapters (minimum two per level) they address their performance anxiety, fear of disapproval, the impact of others' views on their lives, their self-esteem, their changing bodies and educational attrition.

We see them go through big milestones like their first job, learn to drive, make new friendships, experience their first love and heartbreak, find their identity, and overcome all kinds of challenges, including an epidemic that was called when they were in high school. . 2.

Noah, 13 from Laval, in his guitar lesson.

Photo provided by Télé-Québec

Noah, 13 from Laval, in his guitar lesson.

“I was expecting it to become a lot more concrete as we get closer to the broadcast in Stage 5 [que les ados] They were going to start censoring themselves, but no. Their last interviews/confessions over these five years were so heartfelt and real that we wanted to sprinkle them throughout the episodes. The second stage 5 interviews were very “fun” and the look they took on the different years they passed was very powerful,” the director argued.

Their role is barriers

Born on a farm, Victoria cares for dozens of sheep alone and fears the judgment of others. Loïc is in a sports-study program, while Émy is working hard to get into a similar program.

Victoria, 13, returns from a trip to Alberta.

Photo provided by Télé-Québec

Victoria, 13, returns from a trip to Alberta.

Andre and his family fled the war in Syria, where they lived comfortably in ISIS suburbs. When they arrived in Quebec, they had to start over. The entire family studies because the parents' charters are not recognized.

Rachel-Andre, 13, in one of her classes.

Photo provided by Télé-Québec

Rachel-Andre, 13, in one of her classes.

For Mika, a type 1 diabetic, high school rhymes with friends and autonomy, while Rachel-Andre will travel to gain better self-esteem.

Jean-Émilien, 13 years old, from Mashteuiatsh.

Photo provided by Télé-Québec

Jean-Émilien, 13 years old, from Mashteuiatsh.

Ashley Deborah attends an immersion class in Montreal-North Borough. Jean-Émilien, a shy boy from the Inu community of Mashteuiatsh in Lac-Saint-Jean, is the first in his family to finish high school and hopes to become a police officer. Benjamin and Noah, two childhood friends who didn't attend the same high school, each evolve at their own pace.

Being young Airs on Télé-Québec starting January 11 at 8 p.m.

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