December 3, 2021

MoviesOnline

Complete Canadian News World

Astronomy - GeekWeek, Science - Geekweek Interia

Astronomy – GeekWeek, Science – Geekweek Interia

Last Thursday (October 28), the surface of the sun reached A series of X-ray bursts, including the most powerful in this solar cycle, Class X1.0As the plasma cloud began to rush towards the Earth.

According to NASA, the solar wind is full of charged particles, It will reach the Earth’s magnetic poles on Saturday (30.10) pm or at night from Saturday to Sunday (30 / 31.10), causing a strong geomagnetic storm in the ionosphere and exosphere.

It will show the amazing northern lights, which will be admired not only by the inhabitants of the Far North, but also by us. The latest forecasts indicate At least G3 grade geomagnetic storm (Kp = 7)This means that the aurora will also dance over Poland.

The stronger the storm, the more colors the aurora borealis and the greater the sky coverage. To see it, you have to go to a dark placeAway from artificial lighting and looking towards the northern sky. With a stronger storm, the aurora borealis could be seen even at its peak.

However, severe geomagnetic storms also have a dangerous face, as they can provoke Interfering with radio and satellite communicationsand damage sensitive electronic devices and the power grid.

In the twilight era, airline passengers, as well as astronauts were on board International Space Station, receiving more radiation than usual, which may affect their health.

Northern lights It is formed in the upper layers of the Earth’s atmosphere, in the ionosphere and exosphere, at an altitude of 65-400 km above the surface, usually at a distance of 20-25 degrees from the north and south magnetic poles.

The aurora’s stunning colors are due to the interaction of particles solar wind with air particles. The streaks are usually red when they combine with nitrogen and green when they react with oxygen. Other colors including pearl, pink and purple mix them.

See also  The first such discovery - neutrinos at the Large Hadron Collider